Sansided
Editorials

New York Islanders Four Players Who’s Luck Will Soon Change

TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 29: Mathew Barzal #13 of the New York Islanders waits for a faceoff against the Toronto Maple Leafs during an NHL game at Scotiabank Arena on December 29, 2018 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Islanders defeated the Maple Leafs 4-0.(Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 29: Mathew Barzal #13 of the New York Islanders waits for a faceoff against the Toronto Maple Leafs during an NHL game at Scotiabank Arena on December 29, 2018 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Islanders defeated the Maple Leafs 4-0.(Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
facebooktwitterreddit
4 of 5
new york islanders
GLENDALE, ARIZONA – DECEMBER 18: Leo Komarov #47 of the New York Islanders during the NHL game against the Arizona Coyotes at Gila River Arena on December 18, 2018 in Glendale, Arizona. The Islanders defeated the Coyotes 3-1. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Leo Komarov | PDO: 105.6

5on5 on-ice shooting percentage: 10.61
5on5 on-ice save percentage: 95.00

With a 105.6 PDO Leo Komarov ranks third highest on the New York Islanders. Ross Johnston is the highest with a 106.7. With that high PDO Leo Komarov is due to come back down to earth during the second half of the season.

Komarov already has six goals on the season. At this rate Komarov is on pace to score ten goals this season. He had seven in 74 games last year for the Toronto Maple Leafs. But when you consider that Komarov scored 19 goals in 2015-16 and 14 in 2016-17 maybe it won’t be his goal scoring rate that will dry up.

Maybe its the number of saves that occur when he’s on the ice.

Komarov holds a 95 percent 5on5 on-ice save percentage. That’s incredible. That’s going to give at some point. Robin Lehner probably won’t go through the entire 2018-19 season with a 0.931 save percentage and nor will Thomas Greiss keep up that 0.920 save percentage he’s got.

The Islanders won’t always be as defensively stingy when Komarov is on the ice. There’s a reason that the move for Komarov was disparaged at the start of the season. It because typically he gives up more opportunities than he creates. That hasn’t been the case so far this season for Komarov. But in the second half it just might.

It’s entirely possible that Komarov ends the season with a PDO above 100, but it’s not likely that he’ll keep a 105 PDO pace until April.

facebooktwitterreddit