Sansided
Editorials

New York Islanders Power Play Setup Options

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 09: Ryan Pulock #6 of the New York Islanders celebrates his game winning goal at 2:23 of overtime against the Colorado Avalanche at the Barclays Center on February 09, 2019 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The Islanders defeated the Avalanche 4-3. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 09: Ryan Pulock #6 of the New York Islanders celebrates his game winning goal at 2:23 of overtime against the Colorado Avalanche at the Barclays Center on February 09, 2019 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. The Islanders defeated the Avalanche 4-3. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
facebooktwitterreddit
3 of 3
new york islanders
NEW YORK, NEW YORK – FEBRUARY 09: Josh Bailey #12 of the New York Islanders scores at 8:03 of the third period against the Colorado Avalanche at the Barclays Center on February 09, 2019 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Power Play Unit 2

Forward: Jordan Eberle-Anthony Beauvillier-Josh Bailey
Defence: Nick Leddy-Johnny Boychuk

This power play unit looks balanced. At the moment it isn’t. With all due respect to Cal Clutterbuck, he’s a fine hockey player, but his talents do not suit the power play.

We’ve seen what Anthony Beauvillier is capable of when he plays down the middle and operates primarily between the two faceoff dots. Ask the New York Rangers. Beauvillier recorded a hat-trick back in December against the Rangers playing right in that position.

With Jordan Eberle and Josh Bailey on the wing, the New York Islanders have two capable puck movers to pull defenders out of position and give Beau or the blue line an opening.

(Although Bailey needs to be quicker with his decision making and puck movement.)

On the blue line, the Islanders have Nick Leddy to quarterback the play and direct accurate shots towards the net for tips, redirects, or juicy rebounds. And then there’s Johnny Boychuk’s booming and accurate slapshot.

This power play may lack some of the big name forwards on the Islanders roster, but it’s clear that it has balance and can create offence from a few avenues.

Want your voice heard? Join the Eyes On Isles team!

Write for us!

The contration ofoffense is on unit one, that’s clear. But if it works (and from what we’ve seen recently there’s no reason to think it won’t) what’s the problem? Again, Tampa Bay don’t seem to have a single issue with concentrating most of their offense in unit one.

facebooktwitterreddit