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Islanders: NHL and NHLPA have tentative agreement for 20-21 season

Apr 19, 2018; Columbus, OH, USA; A view of an official game puck with the Stanley Cup logo prior to the Washington Capitals against the Columbus Blue Jackets in game four of the first round of the 2018 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Nationwide Arena. Mandatory Credit: Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 19, 2018; Columbus, OH, USA; A view of an official game puck with the Stanley Cup logo prior to the Washington Capitals against the Columbus Blue Jackets in game four of the first round of the 2018 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Nationwide Arena. Mandatory Credit: Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports
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The NHL and the players union have agreed to a tentative agreement to begin the 20-21 season. Here’s what that means for the New York Islanders.

On Friday evening, news broke that the NHL and NHLPA have come to a tentative agreement on how to start the 20-21 NHL season. This means we’re one very important step closer to seeing the New York Islanders back on the ice.

The agreement still requires approval from the owners and the players, but recently when an agreement is put before the owners and players both parties sign off on it.

Here are some of the key takeaways from the deal as we know it.

Key Details of Agreement

Again, none of this has been voted on yet and could technically change. The NHL is also waiting on word from public health organization – specifically from provincial health authorities in Canada – for certain details:

  • Training camp opens on January 3
  • Camps open Dec 30 for the seven non-playoff teams (OTT, BUF, SJS, NJD, DET, LAK, ANA)
  • No exhibition games
  • Regular season begins January 13
  • 4-6 player taxi squads
  • Players can opt-out; contracts would carry over
  • Schedules have not been released

The big thing for the New York Islanders here is the taxi squad deal. With very little cap space already, adding more names and salaries to the roster would be an issue. According to TSN’s Frank Seravalli, these players will be paid their AHL salaries.

When it comes to opting-out, a player can decide to not play if they or an immediate family member is considered “high-risk”.  Again, their contracts would carry-over to the next year. If opt-outs are anything like they are in the NFL, the cap hit for a player who opts out won’t count towards the cap.

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This is still a fluid development that is still subject to change but this is also an exciting development. New York Islanders hockey is likely back in less than a month. Lets. Go.

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